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Consumer Impact on Agriculture – America’s Heartland: Episode 903

August 17, 2019


America’s Heartland
is made possible by… Farm Credit –
financing agriculture and rural America since 1916. Farm Credit is
cooperatively owned by America’s farmers
and ranchers. Learn more at
farmcredit.com.   Croplife America.. Representing the companies
whose modern farming innovations help America’s farmers provide
nutritious food for communities around the globe.   Hi I’m Jason Shoultz. Are you more particular
these days about the food that makes its way
to your dinner table? You’re not alone. Just ahead, consumers
make their voices heard and we’ll give you some insights
on how producers are responding.   We’ll take you to California
here one of the nation’s largest
poultry producers addresses animal welfare
in their birds’ housing and diets to become
American Humane Certified. An Idaho produce farm
uses technology that lets consumers track their food
right back to the field. We’ll do a little shopping
in Kansas City where fresh baked bread helps
consumers support local farmers. And meeting the dining demands
of passengers on long haul flights:
It’s bon appetit
at 30 thousand feet! It’s all coming up
on America’s Heartland.   ♪You can see it in the eyes
of every woman and man♪ ♪In America’s Heartland♪ ♪Living close to the land
there’s a love for the country♪ ♪And a pride in the brand♪ ♪In America’s Heartland♪ ♪Living close♪
♪Close to the land♪   When it comes to food
and food products, consumers want more
and better choices these days. Whether you grow some
of your own food in a garden like this one or do
your shopping at a supermarket, folks want to know:
What’s healthier for you? Is a particular product
really a good value? The internet has made it
so much easier to access food information and many
consumers are acting on that.   The dramatic growth
of farmers markets in the past 15 years shows that
an increasing number of consumers want,
not only locally produced foods, but want to support local
farmers and ranchers as well. Look around your supermarket. The increase in product choices
is an indication of demand. Take yogurt for example. Yogurt consumption in the U.S.
has more than doubled
since 2001. And consumers have prompted
labeling changes to discover more about things like
“sustainable farming” “gluten free” products
and “organic” foods.   Add to all of those – a
discussion about animal welfare. For one poultry producer
in California, it’s meant sharing information
about what goes into getting their birds to market.   This is the original chicken
house. Max and Verda built this
on weekends and after work. This chicken house cost $300. His title is actually Manager
of Live Production.. but it’s easy to convince
Kirk Lipincott to become
your tour guide.. and historian..
as he shows you around this modest farm
in central California. This is the original home
and poultry farm of Max
and Verda Foster, started way back in 1938
when Max gave up his job at a local newspaper to move
his family to the country.>>So he bought this 80 acres
and he thought, you know.. what could we do Verda
to make some income off this?>>Their idea –
raise turkeys and chickens
to sell to local stores. For Max, that meant building
a feed mill, a grow house, even a hatchery..
all from “scratch.” Verda had this hatchery built
right by her back door because every hour Verda would go out
there and rotate so that the eggs would be, have good
quality chicks coming out. And so she was out there
every hour around the clock, and a chick takes about
21 days to hatch. And so imagine 21 days, seven
days a week, 24 hours a day, making sure they’re right
all of the time.>>Though empty today, this
“Foster Farm” is a kind of shrine to an amazing couple
who took these humble beginnings and became one of the nation’s
largest poultry producers. Foster Farms today produces
hundreds of millions of pounds of chickens, turkeys
and other products sold up and down the west coast.   I’m very proud of what I do. You know, I don’t consider
my job as a veterinarian as different from, you know,
a clinic veterinarian who’s treating dogs or cats.>>Bob O’Connor seems
comfortable surrounded by the 40-thousand chickens in this modern grow-out house. The avian expert has spent
the past fifteen years
at Foster Farms making sure these chickens
are raised safely and humanely.. with strict bio-security
measures to keep out disease. Easy access to water.. And a controlled environment
far more advanced than those
old chicken houses.  >>This is all automated. So, you know if the temperature
goes up in this house, we might want to pull air
through these cool cell pads and bring it all the way
to the end of the house to exhaust it. That evaporative cooled air
then cools the birds and lowers the temperature of the house.  >>Diana Shaver spends most
of her time visiting close to fifty growing facilities all
over northern California.. making sure as many as
twenty million birds each year are well-fed and comfortable.  >>Even though we do the same –
we follow the same guidelines, flock in and flock out
on any facility that I have, each one is different. The weather
is slightly different, the birds that we bring in,
your know their personality, their eating habits
are slightly different, and it’s just something
you have to adjust, time in and time out.>>That care and feeding recently helped Foster Farms
earn “humane certification” from the American
Humane Association. That 140-year old organization
is dedicated to the safe and humane treatment
of farm animals. Their science-based platform
applies two hundred standards that American farmers
must meet to be certified.. including keeping their animals
free from hunger, thirst,
pain and fear, and allowing them the ability
to express natural behaviors.   When you put all of this
together, now with having the American Humane Certified
process and label on their products,
Foster Farms is able to declare to their consumers that their
animals are raised humanely.. It’s important for Americans
to have faith in the products
that they’re buying; that third-party assurance is
what consumers are looking for.>>We have always tried
to raise chickens, even as we got larger, in a way that respects
their basic needs. What makes it different is we
have to meet those standards
24/7, 365 days a year. We’re audited
throughout the year. We have to demonstrate
what happened last week, what happened last month,
what happened three months ago.   Those humane practices
are being passed on to a new generation of poultry producers. Angelina Tracy is a sophomore
at Fresno State University. She’s among more than three
dozen poultry science students taking care of about
twenty-thousand week-old chicks in this new, state-of-the-art
teaching facility right
on campus.   We walk in there,
we look at their feed, we look at their water,
we make sure they’re healthy, we make sure their environment,
in terms of humidity, temperature, is good to go. A lot of times you’re out here
by yourself so you really need to be on your toes
and figure things out. I’m extremely lucky and beyond
grateful that I get to work here and actually be a part
of something huge because nobody has something like this.>>This is how
a big barn is run. This is how big industry works. This is how we take care
of our animals. This is how we do it correctly. It really is a commitment by
Foster Farms and the university to provide a hands-on education
experience for the students.  >>Nowadays, there’s
an increased consumer focus on food safety
and animal welfare. That’s why large producers
like Foster Farms are hoping third-party humane
certifications and a commitment to ag education will help
assure buyers that their
values are shared, and have been
since the beginning.  >>I’m actually proud of the
fact we’re showing consumers, you know, look, we do it. We document it
and it’s verified.  >>It’s good for you,
it’s good for your family, and you can take it home
and cook it that night and have no worries.  >>We’ll give up things
to get quality. We’ll give up less profit
to get quality. Max, Verda
have always done that. We have always done that.   Ready for a little “gee whiz”
info about chickens? Studies show that chickens
and dinosaurs.. like the Tyrannosaurus Rex.. share some of the same
genetic material. And while they generally
strut from place to place.. chickens can race about
10 miles an hour if they have to get somewhere..
fast.   Ask any home gardener
what prompts his or her “green thumb” and they’ll tell you that
they like their produce fresh from the garden. Many will also say that they
like the fact that they know where their food is coming from. Well, technology is making it
possible for some consumers to even track their food back
to commercial growers. Our Rob Stewart takes us
to a farm in Idaho where some high tech farming
is part of a project to insure food quality.   Would you believe that
the next time you buy a bag
of onions at the grocery store – you could track the onions
back to the exact field and farmer that grew them? Well, you can, if there’s
a Trace Produce dot com label
on them!   Millions of Idaho
and Oregon onions – fresh from the fields –
are on the move to grocery stores nationwide! And every step of the way..   their journey will be tracked, thanks to a traceability program
created at Fort Boise Produce here in Parma, Idaho. Just find the code
on the Trace Produce label.. and the story of your bag
of onions unfolds.  >>So then with the code
on the back of the package we can type that in
at the website, anybody who buys these onions
can do this..   and what we’ll pull up
is all kinds of detailed information
about those onions. So as you can see here
we’ll have a Google map of the actual field
that those onions came from. We also have a video
of the grower and growing operation where
the growers can talk about their operation and how
they grew the onions. And then we also have
a shipper video here which is actually our packing operation
which shows how these onions were packaged and put
in their final packaging for the consumer to see.  >>In this era of increased
focus on food safety, tracing one’s food is becoming
increasingly important for consumers,
each lot of onions is labeled and loaded in the field
into a truck bound
for the packaging plant.   ♪   Once inside.. the onions are
inspected – sampled – and even recorded on video for
potential buyers to watch on the traceability website.   After the bioterrorism act of
2001 which involved food safety. Everybody has to do one step
forward and one step backward on traceability. So a lot of growers and shippers
have implemented traceability in their systems, but they haven’t taken it
to the consumer level.>>Joe Farmer created the
Trace Produce dot com program.. now, he’s opened it up
for other growers and packers to use nationwide. ♪   The Farmer family has
deep roots in innovation. Joe’s grandfather Warren
was a row crop farmer.. he invented a self-propelled
beet harvester, seen here from the 1950s.   Today Warren’s two sons are the
leaders of Fort Boise Produce.. and say their father would be
proud that his pioneering spirit
lives on.   He’d be amazed. I mean he operated
with a ten key adding machine, was the closest he ever got
to automated accounting so, he’d be blown away
by the technology alone and I’m sure he’d be proud
of what we developed.>>More than a million
50 pound bags of onions will pass through the plant.. 22 hundred bags an hour. And each one, can be
traced back to its roots.>>There’s always new mandates
coming down the line from the FDA and a few more
mandates are going to come. It’s adding cost to
the growers and shippers, but there’s no getting
around it. You’ve got to do it. It’s what’s expected now
just required of growers and shippers to be able
to have that traceability. Heaven forbid if there
was ever any problem. Onions of course
are a very safe product. But if there ever were a problem
it would be very easy to recall
the onions – it’s just adds to the safety
of our product I believe.  >>Yeah, it’s pretty amazing.. I don’t think my great granddad
out on the sheep ranch would have thought that
a consumer back in New York might be able to see the farm
and grower that farmed their onions on
a little computer device. So, yeah, it’s pretty amazing.   Potatoes are the most important
“Non-cereal” crop in the world. And potatoes have
a long history.. dating back to the Incas
who raised them in the Andes Mountains
of South America. Explorers brought them back
to Europe in the 1500’s and they became
an important food staple in the British Isles.   IT’S ALWAYS FUN TO FIND
A GREAT PRODUCT THAT YOU CAN ENJOY
AND SHARE WITH OTHERS. TELL A FRIEND AND, SOON,
YOU’VE CREATED CONSUMER DEMAND. AND THE CALL FOR DELICIOUS
ARTISANAL BREAD PRODUCTS IS ONE OF THOSE AREAS WHERE
CONSUMERS HAVE PROMPTED
A GROWTH- FROM FRENCH BREADS TO PASTRIES. TAKE, FOR EXAMPLE, A PARTNERSHIP
THAT’S SPRUNG UP IN KANSAS. OUR JOHN LOBERTINI SAYS
MANY CONSUMERS CONSIDER IT THE ULTIMATE HOMAGE
TO HEARTLAND WHEAT. ♪   Thank you very much.
See you next time.   “How do the baguettes
look today?” “They look really good.”   MARK FRIEND HAS HAD A LOVE
AFFAIR WITH BREAD FOR 30 YEARS.   I fell in love with bread
before I learned how I tried. And I experimented with
sour dough and all I had was a bunch of stinky pots
of flour and water down in my basement.   FOLLOWING THE TEACHINGS
OF SOME GREAT SOURDOUGH BAKERS, HE WOULD LATER RESHAPE
THOSE KITCHEN DISASTERS INTO WHAT FRIEND NOW CALLS: “FARM TO MARKET.”   We were trying to find a name
and “Farm to Market” was something that was suggested
and seemed to fit the idea of trying to source our products from our farmers that we
would have a relationship with.”   “FARM TO MARKET” WANTS YOU TO KNOW ITS FARMERS
AND THE WHEAT THEY’RE GROWING. BACK IN THE PANTRY THE
INGREDIENTS HAVE A DISTINCTLY
MIDWESTERN FLAVOR: ILLINOIS, MICHIGAN,
WISCONSIN AND KANSAS What we’re trying to do here
is make a closer connection to the farmer and know who
the family is that’s growing the wheat, that’s going
into the flour, that’s going into the bread
that’s being sold in the store. THIS IS A BOUTIQUE BAKERY. HANDS CREATE
THE SPECIAL BREADS HERE.. NOT MACHINES. FRESH INGREDIENTS
ARE CAREFULLY CHOSEN: WHEAT, OATS, RAISINS,
SESAME SEEDS. IT’S ALL IMPORTANT
TO CRAIG FLAKER.   There’s a big creative outlet
that’s involved in this. And, that’s where
the artistic side comes in; the size, the volume,
the crumb, the shape.   Specialty products
require a special commitment. Farm to Market bakes breads
and rolls for 40-grocery stores and 90-restaurants
in the Kansas City area. They work 363 days a year. Taking off only Christmas Eve
and Christmas Day.  >>What is your favorite?
Rye, Wheat, White, Dark?   We get a lot of grief.
Where’s the Ciabatta bread? Well, we brought in 20 loaves
and they were gone by one.. and that’s all there is. MANY OF THE COMMUNITIES HERE..
BOTH IN THE CITY AND RURAL AREAS HAVE POPULATIONS THAT CAME
ORIGINALLY FROM EUROPE. PEOPLE OF GERMAN, POLISH,
FRENCH, RUSSIAN AND ITALIAN DESCENT CLAMOR FOR THESE
HEARTY BREADS:   ARMEN BAGIYANTS GETS
THE HAND MADE DOUGH FROM FARM TO MARKET AND BAKES
LOAVES FRESH AT HIS STORE.   Customers like that one because
front door, customer walks
in the store.. and they can look how
I bake bread. How I put it in the oven
and how I take from
the oven hot.   “FARM TO MARKET” COMPLETES A THEME AT
THE HEN HOUSE SUPERMARKET CHAIN: “BUY FRESH, BUY LOCAL.” -EVEN TO PRODUCE THAT CARRIES
THE FACE AND NAME OF THE FARMER
THAT GREW IT.   The average item
in the Supermarket travels about 15-hundred miles
to get here; and these items are
all within 200-miles. They have a sense
that it’s fresher, that it’s better for them.   BUT “FARM TO MARKET”
IS GOING EVEN FURTHER: TESTING DIFFERENT WAYS
TO MILL THE FLOWER GIVING THEIR BREADS..
DIFFERENT TEXTURES. It’s easy to see differences
in the handling characteristics
of dough.   AND THAT DIFFERENCE
HAS LED THEM TO SEEK OUT FARMERS INTERESTED IN MILLING
THEIR OWN GRAIN.   There’s a big enough market
now in the US for artisan
style bread that there needs to be a flour
that’s suited for this too. BUT BREAD IS SOMETIMES
A FICKLE PARTNER.   Our Grains Galore,
that’s one of our top sellers.   THOSE WHO WORK CLOSELY WITH
THESE INGREDIENTS FROM THE HEARTLAND WILL TELL YOU THIS
DOUGH IS A “LIVING” ORGANISM. AN ORGANISM THAT
LET’S THEM KNOW, EVERYDAY, HOW WELL THEY’RE
DOING THEIR JOB.   When bread comes out
of the oven, you know it has this brown glow to it,
it’s hot coming out of the oven. It’s incredible.
It makes you feel proud.   Let’s talk about
a little “speed” and a little “superstition”
when it comes to bread. Today’s farm equipment
is so efficient that it takes less than ten seconds
for a combine to harvest enough wheat to make
more than 70 loaves of bread. And.. an old Scandinavian tradition
holds that if a boy and girl eat from the same loaf of bread
they’re bound to fall in love. Perhaps a Rye Bread Romance?   Meeting the needs of consumers
is a game that plays out in the sky as well
as grocery stores, restaurants,
and farmers markets. We’ve done a number of stories
on people who love to sample new foods on vacation-
be it a resort, a cruise, or on that long haul flight
that’s taking them on vacation across the Atlantic or Pacific. But meeting that demand requires
attention to detail and a veritable army to deliver
the right food at the right time.   THE TAKEOFF ON ANY VACATION..
OR BUSINESS TRIP.. GIVES TRAVELERS AN OPPORTUNITY
TO SHARE IN NEW EXPERIENCES. ONE OF THOSE IS FOOD. AND WITH NEW OFFERINGS
OF IN FLIGHT MEALS, YOU CAN START ENJOYING
THAT OPPORTUNITY.. EVEN BEFORE YOU REACH
YOUR DESTINATION. BUT PROVIDING THE HEARTLAND’S
BEST TO AIRLINE PASSENGERS BEGINS WELL BEFORE THE PLANE
PULLS UP TO YOUR DEPARTURE GATE. We follow specifications
very closely. We want to make sure that
we meet the requirements and the expectations
of the customer. We assign specific employees
to help us produce the different types of cuisines
that we have here. A very talented group
of people here. SIDNEY HO IS A MANAGER
WITH GATE GOURMET.. A CULINARY CATERING OPERATION
THAT SERVES SOME THREE DOZEN AIRPORTS ALL ACROSS
THE UNITED STATES AS WELL AS KITCHEN OPERATIONS
OVERSEAS.   For years people joked about
airline food, oh airline food. But when I look at this stuff
here, it looks pretty good.>>We pay close attention
to quality. Quality is very important. From the time that we receive
products there are critical control points throughout the
process that we follow closely. We monitor temperatures.
We monitor the quality of food.   THINK ABOUT THE CHALLENGES
OF PRODUCING LARGE NUMBERS OF MEALS ATTRACTIVE TO BOTH
THE EYE AND THE PALATE! FIRST OF ALL YOU NEED
DETAILED ORGANIZATION: FOOD THAT IS PREPPED, FULLY
COOKED, QUICKLY COOLED, TRANSPORTED TO THE RUNWAY
AND LOADED ON BOARD. AND DEPENDING
ON YOUR DESTINATION, SPECIAL MENUS DEMAND
SPECIAL ATTENTION: ASIAN FAVORITES,
REGIONAL EUROPEAN CUISINE, APPETIZERS AND DESSERTS. AND IF YOU THINK IT’S ALL
DONE IN LARGE QUANTITIES.. THINK AGAIN.   Here you are preparing it
in a frying pan right?>>Yes, we make it fresh. You want to make it fresh
so it goes- and then where does it go
from here?  >>After we cook we check
the temperature make sure it’s all the way cooked..   it’s all- it has to reach over 165,
I make sure it very well done cook and then we- we take out
and put in a flash chiller, down in the cooler to below 40.   It looks like it’s
about done to me.  >>Yes Sir.   HEARTLAND HARVESTS GIVE CHEFS
THE INGREDIENTS TO TURN OUT MILLIONS OF MEALS EACH YEAR. BEEF AND SEAFOOD FROM
THE OPEN RANGE AND OCEAN. DAIRY PRODUCTS FROM THE MIDWEST,
PEACHES FROM THE SOUTH. AND HERE.. AT THEIR
SAN FRANCISCO FACILITY.. PRODUCE THAT COMES FROM FARMS
JUST A SHORT DRIVE AWAY. We have a great market here-
Salinas, down the street. We have Gilroy here
in California, again, everything fresh; fresh,
we got it. Citrus? California citrus right here,
right? That’s right.
That’s right. THE ADVANTAGE OF WORKING
WITH THE AIRLINE INDUSTRY GIVES YOU ACCESS TO
HEARTLAND FOODSTUFFS THAT CAN BE FLOWN IN FROM
ACROSS THE COUNTRY. It’s not every day you see
lobster on an airline flight.>>Right. Yeah, we have-
this is a rock lobster. We use also Maine lobster.
Different airlines again. Uh..  >>That’s for your
first-class passenger? That’s correct.
About like in a month ago, we actually did a very
important charter for the- the president of Taiwan,
and they all wanted
fresh lobster in- in the entire flight.   AND WHILE ALL OF THIS IS HEADED
FOR PASSENGERS ON FLIGHTS AROUND THE WORLD, WE SHOULD NOTE
THAT CREW MEMBERS HAVE SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS WHEN IT COMES TO THE FOOD
THAT THEY’LL EAT ON BOARD. And then also an interesting
fact, for example, the pilots, they cannot have seafood, and
also if there are two pilots, they- they have different meals,
just, you know, so if something happened, then- GIVEN THE “GLOBAL” MARKETPLACE
IN TRAVEL TODAY, SPECIAL MENUS FROM HEARTLAND
HARVESTS MUST BE TAILORED.. AS WELL..
TO SPECIAL DIETARY NEEDS. THAT CAN MEAN ANYTHING
FROM MEATLESS MEALS TO RELIGIOUS CONSIDERATIONS. We have a lot of like- like
special meals- kosher meals, child meals, Muslim,
Hindu, gluten-free. AS WITH ANY BUSINESS,
MEETING THOSE DEMANDS MEANS SETTING UP SYSTEMS
TO DELIVER MEALS.. IN A TIMELY
AND EFFICIENT MANNER. Yeah. We have, of course
many different stations in our kitchen. It’s a- it’s a large facility. We have a marinade station,
as well.   AFTER THE PREPARATION,
PACKING AND COOLING.. THE AIRLINE MEALS ARE STORED
UNTIL CALLED UP FOR DELIVERY TO DOZENS OF PLANES
ON THE CONCOURSE.   SPECIFIC MEALS FOR
SPECIFIC DESTINATIONS.. FIRST CLASS AND MAIN
CABIN MEALS… APPETIZERS, DESSERTS AND SNACKS.   USING THE HEARTLAND’S
FINEST INGREDIENTS IS ALL PART OF AN EFFORT TO REINVENT
“FINE DINING” IN THE SKY. OR.. PUT ANOTHER WAY: “BON APPETIT
AT 30 THOUSAND FEET.”  >>I think it’s the passions
that the chefs have to want to produce a good product. It’s the challenge of producing
high volume products and having quality
built into it. I think the chefs here
do have a passion and they do have a culinary
flair to want to do a good product
for the passengers.   We know a lot of you
turn to us for information about agriculture and there are
some neat things to check out on our website. Everything from heartland
recipes to educational
study guides. Just log on to our website
at America’s Heartland dot org. And, of course,
there’s lots going on in our social media arena.
You’ll find us there as well, You’ll find us there too. We’ll see you next time right
here on America’s Heartland.   You can purchase a DVD
or Blu Ray copy of this program. Here’s the cost:   To order, just visit us online
or call 888-814-3923.   ♪You can see it in the eyes
of every woman and man♪ ♪In America’s Heartland
Living close to the land♪ ♪There’s a love for the country
And a pride in the brand♪ ♪In America’s Heartland
Living close♪ ♪Close to the land♪   America’s Heartland
is made possible by..   Farm Credit – financing agriculture
and rural America since 1916. Farm Credit is cooperatively
owned by America’s farmers and ranchers. Learn more at farmcredit.com. Croplife America.. Representing the companies
whose modern farming innovations help America’s farmers provide
nutritious food for communities around the globe.  

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