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California Garden Tour – February 2019 – Gardening Tips, Harvests & Things To Do

November 7, 2019


– [Narrator] Welcome to the California garden in the month of February. This month we reap the winter harvest and prepare the garden for
the upcoming spring season. We will begin with a garden tour, we will look at the
harvest we made this month, we will look at some things
for you to do in your garden, and finally, we’ll take a look at some cool gardening products. So let’s begin with the garden tour starting with the raised beds. We have our single Black
Cobra pepper plant. We moved the other pepper plant into the greenhouse as it was very cold. The rest of the bed just has a lot of compost that was added and has been prepared for
the next growing season. On the next bed we have a lot of beet plants that are growing. And as you can see here, they
are growing pretty well now. You can see some beets
being formed as well. And I think in about a month the beets should be ready for harvest. On the other side we
have the broccoli plants, this is the Green Magic broccoli plant. And the broccolis have grown really well and now they’re just
producing side shoots. right next to the broccoli plants we have some cabbage
plants that are growing and these cabbage plants should be ready for harvest very soon. And on the other bed we have some onion plants as you can see. Next to the onion plants
we have some potato plants. Now these are the potato plants that we were growing in trenches. As the potato plants grow, they will be covering up these
potato plants with some soil, and then they’ll be able to grow well and produce potatoes under the soil. And moving on to containers, we have our Swiss chard plants that are growing really well. And we have been harvesting
Swiss chard till now and it’s been a few months
since we’re harvesting some Swiss chard from these plants. And right next to that
we have a tomato plant. This is our first tomato for the season and it’s been very cold, so it’s not been growing that well. Same thing with the eggplant
as you can see here, it’s not growing that well
due to the cold weather. And finally, we have the
cabbages which is growing well. And that’s because it’s
a cold season crop. We also have our potato plants growing in containers
that have come up now and they will grow well through
the early spring season. In our other containers we
have our ivy gold plants that are pretty much dormant now, our mulberry tree which is growing well. And the pineapple tree
seems to have survived the winters very well as you can see here growing well along with the citrus trees. And now let’s look at the harvest we made this month beginning with bananas. We harvested our Rajapuri bananas and the first thing we are doing is cutting off the dried flowers. And then we are harvesting the bananas. And as you can see here,
beautiful looking bananas. They can be used either raw or they will ripen up
very quickly on the shelf. We also harvested a lot of broccoli, this is the Green Magic broccoli. And what you’re seeing here is the main head of the broccoli being harvested. And the main head of the broccoli is the largest head in the plant. And as you can see here, this is the main head and this is gonna be the
bulk of your harvest. Once again, here’s one more plant. We planted about five or six plants in this raised bed and
all of them produced pretty decently sized broccoli heads. Now once the broccoli has
layered the main head, you will also see a lot of
these small broccoli florets growing along the sides of the plant. And you can just harvest them
by just chopping them off. Throughout the lifecycle of this plant as the plant grows larger, you will see a lot of
these broccoli florets growing along the sides of the plant and you can harvest them
for quite some time. And this is the best part
about growing broccoli is that even after you harvest
the main head of the plant, you can still keep harvesting
the florets from the sides and you can extend your harvest season for quite a long time. Moving on to cabbage. We harvested cabbages from our containers. As you can see here,
beautiful looking cabbage. And the weather has been really cold, it’s been cold and rainy. And due to that I did not see any insects or any kind of holes in this cabbage. As you can see here, this is a beautiful looking cabbage head and very easy to grow in this container. Moving on to cauliflower, we harvested a lot of
cauliflowers from our raised beds. And I think cauliflowers were one of our biggest harvest for the season. As you can see here, beautiful
looking cauliflower head. And here’s one more. And this raised bed has a lot of compost and I made sure that I added more and more compost in this raised bed. And the results are pretty telling. You can see that the cauliflower heads are pretty well-sized,
they look beautiful, and I love growing
cauliflowers in the garden just because they are so crunchy and so delicious when they’re eaten fresh. And the cauliflower
leaves are edible as well. You can bake them, you can
make them just like kale chips, can add some spices and bake them. They taste pretty amazing. And here is one more cauliflower head. And as you can see, for
the cauliflowers as well because of all the rains
that we are getting, the cauliflowers hardly have
any insects or diseases. And this is actually the first season that I’ve seen that most of my vegetables did not have any insects on them, no diseases on them. Meyer lemons. Now these lemons are specially
grown for making lemonades. And this is not a true lemon, this is actually a cross between a lemon and some other citrus
variety like an orange. And what you get is a
lemon that’s not so tart, so it’s actually a lemon, it’s not sweet, but it’s not tart as well. So some people really like
the flavor of Meyer lemons and Meyer lemons make excellent lemonade. If you use Meyer lemons to make lemonade, put a comment in the comments box below. Mint, mint is a herb that you can easily grow in your home garden and containers. And as you can see here, we are growing this in a
whiskey barrel container. We are harvesting the mint leaves. As you can see here, very
fresh and very delicious. Mint is pretty much a
maintenance-free plant. You can just grow them
in containers like these and then harvest them as you need it. Now what do we do with mint? We actually make mint rice where you can add mint and spices to rice and it makes a great dish. And as you can see here, once
again, beautiful looking mint, and probably one of the
herbs you can easily grow to get fresh mint from your garden. Now there’s another way to
harvest your mint plants, which is to cut them to the base. As you can see here, we are pretty much cutting it down to the base of the plant. And this will still be okay because the mint plant is
quite an aggressive plant. And although you are chopping
them down to the base, as you can see here, they will grow back very quickly. If you haven’t seen our
episode on growing mint, I highly recommend that you check it out. Mulberries, we were growing
mulberries in this container. This mulberry plant actually started producing berries very early
in the season this year. And as you can see here, we are harvesting these mulberries which go from a red color to black. As you can see here, they are quite small and we are harvesting them
from this mulberry plant which can be very easily grown in this whiskey barrel container. Now the mulberries
usually ripen in spring, however, this time they
ripened in the winter season. So that was pretty interesting. Oranges, these are the
Washington navel oranges and we harvested our final set
of Washington navel oranges from our Washington navel orange plant. And these Alaskan shelling type peas were growing well on our trellis and we were able to harvest quite a lot more pods this month. And moving on to radishes. Now we were growing these white
radishes in our raised beds and as you can see here,
beautiful looking radish. And January and February
were the two months where we harvested most of our radish. And this is a winter radish, it takes quite a long time to grow. But as you can see here, beautiful looking radish, quite big. Along with the other radish variety, the red French breakfast radish variety, this was the other radish
variety that we were growing. Now this radish can be
grown in raised beds as well as in containers, and most of our radish
was grown in raised beds. Mandarins, these are the Kishu mandarins that we’re growing in a container. And we harvested quite a lot
of Kishu mandarins this month. As you can see here, just
beautiful looking mandarins. And this is now becoming
one of my favorite mandarin plants to grow, extremely juicy and delicious fruits. Moving on to wheatgrass. Now we had a detail episode
on growing wheatgrass. And as you can see here, we did harvest some wheatgrass this month. Wheatgrass is extremely nutrition dense, it has as lot of vitamins and minerals. And something that I highly recommend that you grow in your
garden and you consume. And wheatgrass is just
extremely easy to grow. If you follow our growing guide, you will see that it’s so easy to grow and it is something that you should be growing in your home garden. Now let’s look at the things
for you to do this month. The first thing we are
doing is we are continuing to grow our winter vegetables, like radish as you can see here. And we are also preparing
some seed-starting mix using compost, vermiculite,
and some coco coir. And what you just do is mix it up totally and this will form a very
good seed-starting mix. And this is a good time to start your summer vegetables
if you haven’t already. If you’ve been following my videos, you would’ve started your
summer vegetables in January, that’s the optimal time to
start your summer vegetables. But if you haven’t, it doesn’t hurt to start it in February as well. You still have about
four to six weeks to go. So all the seeds that we sowed germinated very well in the
greenhouse pretty quickly. In fact, this is the progress
within about a week or so. We have some gourds, we
have some tomato plants, we have eggplants, some peppers. So a lot of summer vegetables
that are now germinating and available for transplanting within about four to six weeks. And now let’s look at
some gardening products. You can see a lot of winter vegetables for sale at your local Home Depot and you can also see some
summer vegetables for sale. However, you need to make sure that you only buy the cool season crops like cabbage, cauliflower, now because it’s still very cold outside and you do not want to start
your summer vegetables yet. If you have volunteer plants growing like our tomato plant,
that’s a different story. But if you’re buying plants, you should wait for some
time before you set them out. Now Home Depot also has
a lot of fruit trees, you can see some guava trees, you can see some mango trees, they also have a lot
of passion fruit trees. Now the passion fruit trees
are extremely beautiful, they are vines that grow
in a constrained space in your garden and produce
these beautiful fruits. And they also have a lot
of bare-rooted plants like strawberries,
raspberries, blackberries, and some others. So there
are a lot of plants that you can buy from your local Home Depot and start planting them
in your home garden. So there we have it folks, that was our episode on the California garden for the month of February. If you like this video,
do give us a thumbs up. Make sure you subscribe and click on the bell button
to get all future updates. We’ll see you again soon, happy gardening. (gentle music)

79 Comments

  • Reply raja singh February 28, 2019 at 5:07 pm

    Awaited moment….

  • Reply Ayesha Ahmed February 28, 2019 at 5:13 pm

    you are so lucky, you can plants,harvest all 12 month!!

  • Reply Carolina Gardener February 28, 2019 at 5:20 pm

    Nice Harvest!!!

  • Reply Martha Carvajal February 28, 2019 at 5:22 pm

    I love your videos. these are very didactic, well done that spirit me to garden all kind of veggies but I am limited to Houston weather. I would like to have avocados GEM. I saw your video about this and looks like it will be great for this zone. But I have not been able to find them, commercially I only see Haaz. Please let me know where I can find them? thanks.

  • Reply A Ostorga February 28, 2019 at 5:52 pm

    I am someone new to gardening in Southern California. Thank you for sharing videos of your wonderful garden. I want mint lemonade now. Thank you for the information about when to sow seeds for summer. How do you know when it’s time to start transplanting your plants into the garden?

  • Reply FruScarpia February 28, 2019 at 6:23 pm

    Beautiful. I live in a really cold climate and this kind of abundance is just unheard of… Blessings!

  • Reply Excape Plan February 28, 2019 at 6:31 pm

    Very helpful. 👍😊

  • Reply DivaDivaFashionista February 28, 2019 at 6:37 pm

    I thought we weren’t getting a February tour I was so sad. Thanks for sharing with us.

  • Reply Sharmi R February 28, 2019 at 6:42 pm

    What is the name of the white radish variety you have grown? I'm looking for something that doesn't grow as big as daikon.

  • Reply A. C. February 28, 2019 at 6:42 pm

    I did not have much luck with trying to grow grapes last year. I tried to grow it in a container and it did not flourish. Do you have any suggestions?

  • Reply Pandora Fox February 28, 2019 at 6:42 pm

    I love your videos! I would love to just walk through your garden and learn about how you do this! Beautiful harvest!

  • Reply Pandora Fox February 28, 2019 at 6:54 pm

    Okay. At least I know what to do about soil mix… 😂

  • Reply Jeanette Davis February 28, 2019 at 6:57 pm

    when are you setting out your tomatoes and peppers?

  • Reply Gordon Tickle February 28, 2019 at 6:58 pm

    Thank you, We are building an organic garden on our farm in Chiang Rai Northern Thailand and hope to emulate your growing success.

  • Reply Gerry Marmee February 28, 2019 at 7:03 pm

    🌺😀

  • Reply Shalindra Khidake February 28, 2019 at 7:13 pm

    Nice video. Can u tell me from where u buy u'r Rajapuri banana plant? Thank u

  • Reply XSCAPE 2017 February 28, 2019 at 7:27 pm

    Awesome 😊👍

  • Reply calbalu51 February 28, 2019 at 7:37 pm

    I'm encouraged bananas grow in So. Cal. More than 50 years ago, I tasted 'elaichi kela' in Bombay and would like to grow them. However, I cannot seem to find any info. on this particular variety. Could you please shed some light? Thanks.

  • Reply yaakov February 28, 2019 at 7:55 pm

    i think you harvest them to soon (brocoly coliflower) i let mine grow dublde the size and then harvest them
    goodluck:)

  • Reply Jonah Chance February 28, 2019 at 8:53 pm

    I think it would be fun to see you and this guy do a challenge on growing the biggest potato crop. He seems to be very knowledgeable about gardening here is his link https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0SlfvM8eHaL6x9hKB8fp8m9Vd-5E93x2

  • Reply LandonProductions2005// Alicia Lamont is Cutie February 28, 2019 at 9:31 pm

    Cool video! Love your gardening tours!

  • Reply john smith February 28, 2019 at 9:48 pm

    Beautiful stuff.  Very inspiring.  You have a lovely garden.

  • Reply elines acevedo February 28, 2019 at 9:52 pm

    For me, the best part of spring is the gardening videos! The best time to grow gardens where I live is from fall to spring because the summers are too hot for many crops. I have 4 pineapples growing though, I'm super excited for that! 3 different varieties 😋

  • Reply Moh U. February 28, 2019 at 10:12 pm

    Pls show your face in a video

  • Reply Dave The Hillside Gardener February 28, 2019 at 10:42 pm

    Have you been receiving excess rain like most of California this season?

  • Reply London Worms & Garden February 28, 2019 at 11:09 pm

    Great tour and update. I'm so jealous of anywhere that can grow oranges lol. Thanks for sharing 😊👍

  • Reply Arif Iskandar March 1, 2019 at 12:21 am

    I so want you to make a dedicated video about growing mulberries.

  • Reply BohoDiva March 1, 2019 at 12:46 am

    I live in the Sacramento area (zone 9B). I may be jumping the gun since we've had temps as low as 32, but a couple of weeks ago I started caladeums and nonstop begonias in peat pots, which I have indoors; and I planted some ginger in a clear storage tub w/lid which is stored outside in a normally sunny spot on my deck. Do you know when coleus and hostas are available?

  • Reply BetterYouBetterWorld V March 1, 2019 at 1:39 am

    my potted malberries look like your but yellow, what are we doing wrong?

  • Reply BetterYouBetterWorld V March 1, 2019 at 1:43 am

    what is your opinion on this man https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KHZHy3_7PPE apparently, compost does not belong in the soil, and actually does more bad than good

  • Reply Shubh March 1, 2019 at 2:25 am

    Which fertilizers do u use organig or inorganic or both?

  • Reply Shubh March 1, 2019 at 2:25 am

    Which ferilizers do u use?

  • Reply MW S March 1, 2019 at 2:30 am

    We had a hard time growing anything fall-winter-spring over here in the Bay Area. Couldn’t start anything early-mid fall cause it was just too dang hot. In winter it flip flopped between rain for days and warm and sunny for a couple of days. Now spring we are having low evening temps and hot day temps. The weather was so weird we were having aphid problems in winter.
    The only thing that grew nicely were carrots and radishes. 🙁

  • Reply los juguetes de Vick March 1, 2019 at 2:43 am

    👍👏

  • Reply Nik Nak March 1, 2019 at 2:48 am

    Do you have videos on how to grow passionfruit vines in SoCal? I have two, but they are not growing so well and I haven't found any useful advice online. :/

  • Reply JAY PATEL March 1, 2019 at 3:29 am

    Nice

  • Reply BohoDiva March 1, 2019 at 3:35 am

    I make a (meyer) lemon and ginger juice water which I drink hot or cold.

  • Reply horustortoise March 1, 2019 at 3:40 am

    Hi I live in Santa Ana and have two raised beds how do you recommend I plan for the next few months and summer? Thanks

  • Reply Ajay kumar Kakumani March 1, 2019 at 4:10 am

    As I earlier said that your garden looks beautiful and it is 100% true. You are enjoying the harvest, a pretty decent harvest in fact. Thanks for sharing the information…

  • Reply jason March 1, 2019 at 4:41 am

    have you ever grown the broccoli in containers?

  • Reply Susan Anuskiewicz March 1, 2019 at 5:33 am

    Thanks again my friend! I actually use a collard recipe for the cauliflower leaves and cook them in an instant pot. They turned out delicious!

  • Reply Qasim March 1, 2019 at 5:35 am

    Man, your cauliflowers are so nice. I don't know why mine were so small. I put them in ground in San Jose, CA

  • Reply Qasim March 1, 2019 at 5:39 am

    Beautiful white radish. We make Mooli Paratha with it 🙂

  • Reply Qasim March 1, 2019 at 5:41 am

    I am wondering I never saw bitter mellon/bitter guord video from you?

  • Reply CinnamonGirl'sCafe March 1, 2019 at 7:16 am

    From my sister's home, we get a lot of Meyer lemons. I wash the lemons then zest them all. I put the zest on sheet pans with parchment in the oven on low 200F. Once dried put into zip lock and store in the freezer. We juice the lemons once zested. I add a little water to juice. If you don't it becomes sticky in the ice cube trays. I store the lemon cubes until we need for making lemonade or juice for recipes using lemon juice. We usevfpr making lemon bars, cakes and lemon curd for pie or cheese cake. So good.

  • Reply Rick Caliente March 1, 2019 at 1:01 pm

    Just an FYI, Orange County Farm Supply in Orange is having their big tomato event really soon. I went last year and bought some tomato’s I’ve never had before and had great success.

  • Reply Sj Smith March 1, 2019 at 1:53 pm

    I use lemons to make a lemon/blood orange juice concentrate for hot lemonade. To about a quart of juice, I add about a cup of sugar. The hot drink is about 75% water and 25% concentrate (adjust sugar and water to taste). I also make a probiotic lemon ginger drink using whey (really good 'soda' substitute on a hot Spring garden workday) that helps me preserve the lemons for later use.
    I also make lemon curd: https://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/nchfp/factsheets/lemoncurd.html, 
    and lemon quick bread that I can freeze a few months if we don't need it at the time.
    And finally, you can make your own lemon pepper seasoning by grating and drying the rinds. Some people dehydrate slices to add to tea later. I haven't tried that one.
    Happy Gardening!

  • Reply Sj Smith March 1, 2019 at 1:59 pm

    I forget, do you buy plants to transplant or start from seed? I tried starting from seeds this year and they're just not thriving like the store transplants would've. I'm in Riverside County and had lots of rain, as you have. My baby tomatoes look so pale. The Homestead (a determinate) basically died off, but the Black Krim are at least alive and waiting for warm enough weather to transplant. I only recently allowed them to remain outside at night. Tho tedious, I've been moving them outside when daytime is over 50 and pulling them back indoors late afternoon. I don't have grow lights, so this is the best option at the time…. and I'm not too impressed with the results. If you have success growing from seed…. I'll enjoy hearing what you do.

  • Reply johnifly March 1, 2019 at 6:11 pm

    LOVE your garden!! I tried to grow cauliflower years ago and the plants came up just fine but come harvest time, I discovered all the heads were infested with the cabbage butterfly caterpillars. What can I do to prevent this WITHOUT using pesticides? I would think the same would apply for broccoli as well. Thanks! I'd like to try growing them again as there is NOTHING like fresh vegetables as well as broccoli and cauliflower.

  • Reply sandybear00 March 1, 2019 at 9:36 pm

    Given this colder than normal weather in socal, when do you plan on transplanting your spring/summer seedlings into the garden? I'm trying to decide. Love your videos!!

  • Reply EvoWariq March 2, 2019 at 3:40 am

    Where is your avocado tree! havent seen it in 4 years now.

  • Reply Abeed Miah March 2, 2019 at 9:14 am

    Can u make a video how u store ur harvest

  • Reply Janet Petko March 2, 2019 at 11:21 am

    How much of your garden is seed started?

  • Reply GOD420CRUSH 805 March 2, 2019 at 11:42 am

    Great job as always!

  • Reply GOD420CRUSH 805 March 2, 2019 at 11:42 am

    10a fo life! Represent!

  • Reply Lady Enchantress Garden and Travel March 2, 2019 at 12:17 pm

    have so many seeds given by friends.. but I thibk for philippine summer only sunflower is feasible. I'm excited for my brocolli soon

  • Reply Elicy Mathew March 2, 2019 at 6:26 pm

    In New Jersey ,it is still snowing, so sad

  • Reply The Daysy March 3, 2019 at 12:22 am

    In New Zealand and Australia the Meyer lemons are called lemonade fruit 👍

  • Reply ConspiracyBear March 3, 2019 at 4:46 am

    Were making ice cubes out of the meyer lemons. Big ice cube trays. Then into ziplocks. Because the meyer lemons dont last too long woth the natural yeasts etc they have on the skins. Great work thanks

  • Reply CrumplyPizza March 3, 2019 at 4:01 pm

    Please I need help. I bought a owari satsuma Mandarin from home Depot in September and planted it in a pot. I've been watering and fertilizing but it hasn't grown anything since. No new branches, flowers nothing. Please help.

  • Reply Genius1107 March 4, 2019 at 11:58 am

    My tomatoes died cause of the recent freeze

  • Reply Crystal C March 4, 2019 at 6:11 pm

    Always love your videos!

  • Reply Nandana SS March 5, 2019 at 12:13 pm

    Love your channel. Made me start my own garden and channel.

  • Reply Wendi Jackson March 6, 2019 at 2:48 pm

    I subbed after I watched the pineapple growing video.
    I stayed because, for once the accent didn't make me angry at a scammer. Much love and Happy Gardening!

  • Reply Cultivating Organic by Jo & Mig March 6, 2019 at 4:22 pm

    Your garden is always very productive. Great video. Thanks for sharing.

  • Reply sruthi mantena March 6, 2019 at 9:28 pm

    Can make an detailed video on how much garden lime to be mixed in peat moss for raised bed soils for different vegetables like (eggplants,okra,bitter gourd and ridge gourd etc).As i have seen u telling it alters PH of soil

  • Reply Tasha finn PRAYEATLAFFLUV4GIVE March 7, 2019 at 4:58 pm

    Great videos !!! Keep em coming!!!! BEAUTIFUL garden you have !!

  • Reply Tasha finn PRAYEATLAFFLUV4GIVE March 7, 2019 at 5:00 pm

    I have broccoli that's almost ready for harvest

  • Reply Tasha finn PRAYEATLAFFLUV4GIVE March 7, 2019 at 5:04 pm

    Yeeeeeeep !!!
    Got to have mint

  • Reply unconventional farmer March 8, 2019 at 3:19 am

    One of the "BEST" Gardens on YouTube.

  • Reply catuber March 9, 2019 at 5:48 am

    I have watched your videos on and off, but thoroughly enjoyed them, learnt from them, and copied some of your tricks too! I have to say it out: You, sir, are doing a wonderful job! Thank you for your inspiration! (I recently discovered that I share the same growing zone as you!! Perhaps that's a reason I've felt that a few of the things fall easily in the "been there, done that" category with your videos!)

  • Reply Ivan Garcia March 13, 2019 at 7:41 pm

    I really enjoy these videos and keep up with them all the time. Thank you and please, keep going.

  • Reply Mohul March 13, 2019 at 10:50 pm

    Hi, I would love to have curry seeds. I am in california too. Thank you

  • Reply Patricia Russell March 14, 2019 at 10:28 am

    Really enjoy your informative videos, keep up educating us, thanks!

  • Reply myfairy talegimail March 16, 2019 at 4:08 pm

    Thanku. Please make video for the March

  • Reply New ways To do things March 23, 2019 at 3:04 pm

    That cabbage does look beautiful

  • Reply Ms Phasha March 28, 2019 at 10:28 pm

    Wow, subscribed! Found a the refreshing side on YouTube

  • Reply Miscellaneous Mistro April 16, 2019 at 12:44 pm

    What are the benefits of overwintering your plants?

  • Reply Kat Kat April 26, 2019 at 3:18 am

    I just found your channel. Cannot stop watching. Thanks for all the info. Also I find your voice very soothing

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